Contributor: Jamye Wooten

Jamye Wooten is a digital strategist, faith-rooted organizer and 2015 Social Justice Institute Fellow at Boston University School of Theology. Jamye is the founder of Kinetics Communications and publishing editor of KineticsLive.com, an information ministry that integrates theological reflection and practice and uses dialogue as a catalyst for social change. In the Fall of 2015, he launched the #BlackChurchSyllabus, providing resources that help cultivate a deeper theological framework to pursue justice. In April 2015, Jamye co-founded Baltimore United for Change, a coalition of grassroots organizations in Baltimore City that organized in response to the death of #FreddieGray. His Twitter handle is @KineticsLive.

What’s in Your Hand?

An Asset-Based Approach to Community Ministry

In 2015, three days after the death of Freddie Gray, I joined forces with a coalition of grassroots activists and concerned citizens with a long track record of working for social justice in Baltimore to form Baltimore United for Change. We didn't wait for any funding — we put our heads, hearts and hands together and began to do the work. When Baltimore City schools... Read more

No Peace until All the Children are Well

“And how are the children?" goes a traditional greeting of the Maasai people of East Africa that places the safety and wellbeing of children at the forefront of all other community matters. The response, "All the children are well," confirms that the priorities of the community are in order. The Maasia greeting came to mind a few weeks ago when the children... Read more

Beyond Prophetic Rhetoric

Jesus and Justice in Practice

It’s not news to say that this has been a crazy, rancorous election season—perhaps the most ugly in modern history, many pundits claim. Maybe. But when I reflect back on earlier election cycles, there seems to have been plenty of media-infused hostility that we tend to mute in our nostalgic remembrance. The 2008 election of “hope and change,” for instance, was... Read more

Women in Ministry

Is Social Media the Great Equalizer?

I write this on the last day of Women’s History Month. Over on my Twitter account, I spent the month highlighting—via the hashtag #BlackChurchHERStory—African American women religious leaders alive today who have been trailblazers in ministry and in the academy. These pioneers range from the likes of Rev. Dr. Yvonne Delk, who in 1974 became the first African American... Read more

Who Has The Right to Be Violent?

In July I was invited to speak about the #BaltimoreUprising at the Duke Summer Institute for Reconciliation. My presentation focused on “Why We Cry, How We Cry and Who Can Cry?” in response to state violence. “Why We Cry” dealt with the systemic and structural violence in Baltimore City—the years of neglect, disinvestment and underdevelopment. “How We Cry (The... Read more